The Complete Wheel of Time Robert Jordan | Read online

Robert Jordan

For me, this is the definitive work of fantasy literature. Everything I look at reading comes up for comparison with this series--as well it should, as I started reading when there were only 7 books out. I remember eagerly snatching up The Path of Daggers as a teenager when it came out, I remember hunting Winter's Heart down in a local library, and I was devastated when Robert Jordan passed away in 2007.

I lost track of it over time, and only recently reread all 14 books, more than a decade after my journey first started. It took about six months, but I was able to find the first 11 books online.

A few cons, and then to the pros.

--The dialogue, compared to natural-flowing conversation or today's young-adult novels, seems stiff and not how normal conversations would actually go. This is especially noticeable in the first book, but I quickly became desensitized due to the sheer awesomeness of the story.

--several of the women characters (Nynaeve, primarily) are a little-over the top in their drama, and some of the female storylines really bog down the series about halfway through. Women play a HUGE part in this series, but the inter-female drama is clearly told from the viewpoint of a man who somehow sees women as more complex than they actually are.

--Jordan likes describing things. A lot. Between this and the thick female drama, there are several sections of the series where you're tempted to skim more than to read.

--At the 12th book, Brandon Sanderson took over writing after Robert Jordan passed away. A Gathering Storm was the most difficult to read for me, because Sanderson nearly ruined two of my favorite characters up to that point in the story.


So...these seem like pretty big pitfalls, right? Why is it still the best epic fantasy ever?

--The characters. The story progresses, in classic epic style, from humble beginnings to the grand scale. But the characters are SO fullly fleshed out--with flaws, strengths, quirks, and so on. They plot, they pursue their own goals, and they're often convinced of something the reader knows is false. You become intimate with them, like old friends. You feel the sense of wonder at the new world as characters discover things, you can feel the desperation in hopeless situations, you take part in the mirth and frustration and every mood that the characters feel.

--The world-building is massive, meticulous, and consistent throughout the series. I don't mean to say that every nation, culture, quirk, is broken downand explained in detail--but rather, they're fleshed out throughout the series. You become familiar with the distinctive dress, speech, naming conventions, habits, and temperaments of well over a doezn different cultures through the book, without him ever breaking down and having to explain it. At the time that Brandon Sanderson took over the writing, there were about 3 million words of Wheel of Time in print. Robert Jordan's comprehensive notes included more than 4 million words of unpublished description of the world, of character traits, of nations and histories, everything. And that meticulous care is shown in every book.

--The foresight, having read most of the series twice, is incredible. Events in the first book foreshadow events as late as the 13th book, written years after the author had passed away. And by foresight I mean not just in hinting at what's going to happen several books before it does, but also in anticipating what a modern reader would think up and then implementing that. I remember thinking about events and possibilities as they opened up, and imagining (like a silly fantasy nerd kid) how I would do this or use it in that way--and then, two or three books later, feeling both excited that he thought of the same thing I did, and crestfallen because there didn't seem to be an obvious way to improve upon it.

--The "magic" system is beautifully complex, and Robert Jordan never actually calls it magic, which is pretty cool. It's presented as a natural force, which some can "channel," and with rules as straightforward but as complex as normal physics. The fabric of the universe itself, called the Pattern, and the way that our lives (threads of the pattern) weave through it like some giant cosmic quilt, creates a really nifty--but also deep--concept. Which is, like other things in the series, revealed gradually and maintained consistently throughout the series.

--The humor. Sometimes dry, sometimes overt, but usually there's just a sprinking of subtle comedy mixed in that make it readable. He's superb at summing a character up in one or two sentences, from another character's perspective, that makes you just stop and chuckle a bit.

--The ending, which is worth the whole slog. After Book 12, Brandon brings his inconsistencies back in line, and the last two books are almost like one gigantic extended climax. It's fulfilling, and it's satisfying, and it's worth it. And it's comforting to know that Robert Jordan wrote out the entire last scene, years before we actually got to read it.

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This applies to for me, this is the definitive work of fantasy literature. everything i look at reading comes up for comparison with this series--as well it should, as i started reading when there were only 7 books out. i remember eagerly snatching up the path of daggers as a teenager when it came out, i remember hunting winter's heart down in a local library, and i was devastated when robert jordan passed away in 2007.

i lost track of it over time, and only recently reread all 14 books, more than a decade after my journey first started. it took about six months, but i was able to find the first 11 books online.

a few cons, and then to the pros.

--the dialogue, compared to natural-flowing conversation or today's young-adult novels, seems stiff and not how normal conversations would actually go. this is especially noticeable in the first book, but i quickly became desensitized due to the sheer awesomeness of the story.

--several of the women characters (nynaeve, primarily) are a little-over the top in their drama, and some of the female storylines really bog down the series about halfway through. women play a huge part in this series, but the inter-female drama is clearly told from the viewpoint of a man who somehow sees women as more complex than they actually are.

--jordan likes describing things. a lot. between this and the thick female drama, there are several sections of the series where you're tempted to skim more than to read.

--at the 12th book, brandon sanderson took over writing after robert jordan passed away. a gathering storm was the most difficult to read for me, because sanderson nearly ruined two of my favorite characters up to that point in the story.


so...these seem like pretty big pitfalls, right? why is it still the best epic fantasy ever?

--the characters. the story progresses, in classic epic style, from humble beginnings to the grand scale. but the characters are so fullly fleshed out--with flaws, strengths, quirks, and so on. they plot, they pursue their own goals, and they're often convinced of something the reader knows is false. you become intimate with them, like old friends. you feel the sense of wonder at the new world as characters discover things, you can feel the desperation in hopeless situations, you take part in the mirth and frustration and every mood that the characters feel.

--the world-building is massive, meticulous, and consistent throughout the series. i don't mean to say that every nation, culture, quirk, is broken downand explained in detail--but rather, they're fleshed out throughout the series. you become familiar with the distinctive dress, speech, naming conventions, habits, and temperaments of well over a doezn different cultures through the book, without him ever breaking down and having to explain it. at the time that brandon sanderson took over the writing, there were about 3 million words of wheel of time in print. robert jordan's comprehensive notes included more than 4 million words of unpublished description of the world, of character traits, of nations and histories, everything. and that meticulous care is shown in every book.

--the foresight, having read most of the series twice, is incredible. events in the first book foreshadow events as late as the 13th book, written years after the author had passed away. and by foresight i mean not just in hinting at what's going to happen several books before it does, but also in anticipating what a modern reader would think up and then implementing that. i remember thinking about events and possibilities as they opened up, and imagining (like a silly fantasy nerd kid) how i would do this or use it in that way--and then, two or three books later, feeling both excited that he thought of the same thing i did, and crestfallen because there didn't seem to be an obvious way to improve upon it.

--the "magic" system is beautifully complex, and robert jordan never actually calls it magic, which is pretty cool. it's presented as a natural force, which some can "channel," and with rules as straightforward but as complex as normal physics. the fabric of the universe itself, called the pattern, and the way that our lives (threads of the pattern) weave through it like some giant cosmic quilt, creates a really nifty--but also deep--concept. which is, like other things in the series, revealed gradually and maintained consistently throughout the series.

--the humor. sometimes dry, sometimes overt, but usually there's just a sprinking of subtle comedy mixed in that make it readable. he's superb at summing a character up in one or two sentences, from another character's perspective, that makes you just stop and chuckle a bit.

--the ending, which is worth the whole slog. after book 12, brandon brings his inconsistencies back in line, and the last two books are almost like one gigantic extended climax. it's fulfilling, and it's satisfying, and it's worth it. and it's comforting to know that robert jordan wrote out the entire last scene, years before we actually got to read it.
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i lost track of it over time, and only recently reread all 14 books, more than a decade after my journey first started. it took about six months, but i was able to find the first 11 books online.

a few cons, and then to the pros.

--the dialogue, compared to natural-flowing conversation or today's young-adult novels, seems stiff and not how normal conversations would actually go. this is especially noticeable in the first book, but i quickly became desensitized due to the sheer awesomeness of the story.

--several of the women characters (nynaeve, primarily) are a little-over the top in their drama, and some of the female storylines really bog down the series about halfway through. women play a huge part in this series, but the inter-female drama is clearly told from the viewpoint of a man who somehow sees women as more complex than they actually are.

--jordan likes describing things. a lot. between this and the thick female drama, there are several sections of the series where you're tempted to skim more than to read.

--at the 12th book, brandon sanderson took over writing after robert jordan passed away. a gathering storm was the most difficult to read for me, because sanderson nearly ruined two of my favorite characters up to that point in the story.


so...these seem like pretty big pitfalls, right? why is it still the best epic fantasy ever?

--the characters. the story progresses, in classic epic style, from humble beginnings to the grand scale. but the characters are so fullly fleshed out--with flaws, strengths, quirks, and so on. they plot, they pursue their own goals, and they're often convinced of something the reader knows is false. you become intimate with them, like old friends. you feel the sense of wonder at the new world as characters discover things, you can feel the desperation in hopeless situations, you take part in the mirth and frustration and every mood that the characters feel.

--the world-building is massive, meticulous, and consistent throughout the series. i don't mean to say that every nation, culture, quirk, is broken downand explained in detail--but rather, they're fleshed out throughout the series. you become familiar with the distinctive dress, speech, naming conventions, habits, and temperaments of well over a doezn different cultures through the book, without him ever breaking down and having to explain it. at the time that brandon sanderson took over the writing, there were about 3 million words of wheel of time in print. robert jordan's comprehensive notes included more than 4 million words of unpublished description of the world, of character traits, of nations and histories, everything. and that meticulous care is shown in every book.

--the foresight, having read most of the series twice, is incredible. events in the first book foreshadow events as late as the 13th book, written years after the author had passed away. and by foresight i mean not just in hinting at what's going to happen several books before it does, but also in anticipating what a modern reader would think up and then implementing that. i remember thinking about events and possibilities as they opened up, and imagining (like a silly fantasy nerd kid) how i would do this or use it in that way--and then, two or three books later, feeling both excited that he thought of the same thing i did, and crestfallen because there didn't seem to be an obvious way to improve upon it.

--the "magic" system is beautifully complex, and robert jordan never actually calls it magic, which is pretty cool. it's presented as a natural force, which some can "channel," and with rules as straightforward but as complex as normal physics. the fabric of the universe itself, called the pattern, and the way that our lives (threads of the pattern) weave through it like some giant cosmic quilt, creates a really nifty--but also deep--concept. which is, like other things in the series, revealed gradually and maintained consistently throughout the series.

--the humor. sometimes dry, sometimes overt, but usually there's just a sprinking of subtle comedy mixed in that make it readable. he's superb at summing a character up in one or two sentences, from another character's perspective, that makes you just stop and chuckle a bit.

--the ending, which is worth the whole slog. after book 12, brandon brings his inconsistencies back in line, and the last two books are almost like one gigantic extended climax. it's fulfilling, and it's satisfying, and it's worth it. and it's comforting to know that robert jordan wrote out the entire last scene, years before we actually got to read it.
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i lost track of it over time, and only recently reread all 14 books, more than a decade after my journey first started. it took about six months, but i was able to find the first 11 books online.

a few cons, and then to the pros.

--the dialogue, compared to natural-flowing conversation or today's young-adult novels, seems stiff and not how normal conversations would actually go. this is especially noticeable in the first book, but i quickly became desensitized due to the sheer awesomeness of the story.

--several of the women characters (nynaeve, primarily) are a little-over the top in their drama, and some of the female storylines really bog down the series about halfway through. women play a huge part in this series, but the inter-female drama is clearly told from the viewpoint of a man who somehow sees women as more complex than they actually are.

--jordan likes describing things. a lot. between this and the thick female drama, there are several sections of the series where you're tempted to skim more than to read.

--at the 12th book, brandon sanderson took over writing after robert jordan passed away. a gathering storm was the most difficult to read for me, because sanderson nearly ruined two of my favorite characters up to that point in the story.


so...these seem like pretty big pitfalls, right? why is it still the best epic fantasy ever?

--the characters. the story progresses, in classic epic style, from humble beginnings to the grand scale. but the characters are so fullly fleshed out--with flaws, strengths, quirks, and so on. they plot, they pursue their own goals, and they're often convinced of something the reader knows is false. you become intimate with them, like old friends. you feel the sense of wonder at the new world as characters discover things, you can feel the desperation in hopeless situations, you take part in the mirth and frustration and every mood that the characters feel.

--the world-building is massive, meticulous, and consistent throughout the series. i don't mean to say that every nation, culture, quirk, is broken downand explained in detail--but rather, they're fleshed out throughout the series. you become familiar with the distinctive dress, speech, naming conventions, habits, and temperaments of well over a doezn different cultures through the book, without him ever breaking down and having to explain it. at the time that brandon sanderson took over the writing, there were about 3 million words of wheel of time in print. robert jordan's comprehensive notes included more than 4 million words of unpublished description of the world, of character traits, of nations and histories, everything. and that meticulous care is shown in every book.

--the foresight, having read most of the series twice, is incredible. events in the first book foreshadow events as late as the 13th book, written years after the author had passed away. and by foresight i mean not just in hinting at what's going to happen several books before it does, but also in anticipating what a modern reader would think up and then implementing that. i remember thinking about events and possibilities as they opened up, and imagining (like a silly fantasy nerd kid) how i would do this or use it in that way--and then, two or three books later, feeling both excited that he thought of the same thing i did, and crestfallen because there didn't seem to be an obvious way to improve upon it.

--the "magic" system is beautifully complex, and robert jordan never actually calls it magic, which is pretty cool. it's presented as a natural force, which some can "channel," and with rules as straightforward but as complex as normal physics. the fabric of the universe itself, called the pattern, and the way that our lives (threads of the pattern) weave through it like some giant cosmic quilt, creates a really nifty--but also deep--concept. which is, like other things in the series, revealed gradually and maintained consistently throughout the series.

--the humor. sometimes dry, sometimes overt, but usually there's just a sprinking of subtle comedy mixed in that make it readable. he's superb at summing a character up in one or two sentences, from another character's perspective, that makes you just stop and chuckle a bit.

--the ending, which is worth the whole slog. after book 12, brandon brings his inconsistencies back in line, and the last two books are almost like one gigantic extended climax. it's fulfilling, and it's satisfying, and it's worth it. and it's comforting to know that robert jordan wrote out the entire last scene, years before we actually got to read it.
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i lost track of it over time, and only recently reread all 14 books, more than a decade after my journey first started. it took about six months, but i was able to find the first 11 books online.

a few cons, and then to the pros.

--the dialogue, compared to natural-flowing conversation or today's young-adult novels, seems stiff and not how normal conversations would actually go. this is especially noticeable in the first book, but i quickly became desensitized due to the sheer awesomeness of the story.

--several of the women characters (nynaeve, primarily) are a little-over the top in their drama, and some of the female storylines really bog down the series about halfway through. women play a huge part in this series, but the inter-female drama is clearly told from the viewpoint of a man who somehow sees women as more complex than they actually are.

--jordan likes describing things. a lot. between this and the thick female drama, there are several sections of the series where you're tempted to skim more than to read.

--at the 12th book, brandon sanderson took over writing after robert jordan passed away. a gathering storm was the most difficult to read for me, because sanderson nearly ruined two of my favorite characters up to that point in the story.


so...these seem like pretty big pitfalls, right? why is it still the best epic fantasy ever?

--the characters. the story progresses, in classic epic style, from humble beginnings to the grand scale. but the characters are so fullly fleshed out--with flaws, strengths, quirks, and so on. they plot, they pursue their own goals, and they're often convinced of something the reader knows is false. you become intimate with them, like old friends. you feel the sense of wonder at the new world as characters discover things, you can feel the desperation in hopeless situations, you take part in the mirth and frustration and every mood that the characters feel.

--the world-building is massive, meticulous, and consistent throughout the series. i don't mean to say that every nation, culture, quirk, is broken downand explained in detail--but rather, they're fleshed out throughout the series. you become familiar with the distinctive dress, speech, naming conventions, habits, and temperaments of well over a doezn different cultures through the book, without him ever breaking down and having to explain it. at the time that brandon sanderson took over the writing, there were about 3 million words of wheel of time in print. robert jordan's comprehensive notes included more than 4 million words of unpublished description of the world, of character traits, of nations and histories, everything. and that meticulous care is shown in every book.

--the foresight, having read most of the series twice, is incredible. events in the first book foreshadow events as late as the 13th book, written years after the author had passed away. and by foresight i mean not just in hinting at what's going to happen several books before it does, but also in anticipating what a modern reader would think up and then implementing that. i remember thinking about events and possibilities as they opened up, and imagining (like a silly fantasy nerd kid) how i would do this or use it in that way--and then, two or three books later, feeling both excited that he thought of the same thing i did, and crestfallen because there didn't seem to be an obvious way to improve upon it.

--the "magic" system is beautifully complex, and robert jordan never actually calls it magic, which is pretty cool. it's presented as a natural force, which some can "channel," and with rules as straightforward but as complex as normal physics. the fabric of the universe itself, called the pattern, and the way that our lives (threads of the pattern) weave through it like some giant cosmic quilt, creates a really nifty--but also deep--concept. which is, like other things in the series, revealed gradually and maintained consistently throughout the series.

--the humor. sometimes dry, sometimes overt, but usually there's just a sprinking of subtle comedy mixed in that make it readable. he's superb at summing a character up in one or two sentences, from another character's perspective, that makes you just stop and chuckle a bit.

--the ending, which is worth the whole slog. after book 12, brandon brings his inconsistencies back in line, and the last two books are almost like one gigantic extended climax. it's fulfilling, and it's satisfying, and it's worth it. and it's comforting to know that robert jordan wrote out the entire last scene, years before we actually got to read it.
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Set for me, this is the definitive work of fantasy literature. everything i look at reading comes up for comparison with this series--as well it should, as i started reading when there were only 7 books out. i remember eagerly snatching up the path of daggers as a teenager when it came out, i remember hunting winter's heart down in a local library, and i was devastated when robert jordan passed away in 2007.

i lost track of it over time, and only recently reread all 14 books, more than a decade after my journey first started. it took about six months, but i was able to find the first 11 books online.

a few cons, and then to the pros.

--the dialogue, compared to natural-flowing conversation or today's young-adult novels, seems stiff and not how normal conversations would actually go. this is especially noticeable in the first book, but i quickly became desensitized due to the sheer awesomeness of the story.

--several of the women characters (nynaeve, primarily) are a little-over the top in their drama, and some of the female storylines really bog down the series about halfway through. women play a huge part in this series, but the inter-female drama is clearly told from the viewpoint of a man who somehow sees women as more complex than they actually are.

--jordan likes describing things. a lot. between this and the thick female drama, there are several sections of the series where you're tempted to skim more than to read.

--at the 12th book, brandon sanderson took over writing after robert jordan passed away. a gathering storm was the most difficult to read for me, because sanderson nearly ruined two of my favorite characters up to that point in the story.


so...these seem like pretty big pitfalls, right? why is it still the best epic fantasy ever?

--the characters. the story progresses, in classic epic style, from humble beginnings to the grand scale. but the characters are so fullly fleshed out--with flaws, strengths, quirks, and so on. they plot, they pursue their own goals, and they're often convinced of something the reader knows is false. you become intimate with them, like old friends. you feel the sense of wonder at the new world as characters discover things, you can feel the desperation in hopeless situations, you take part in the mirth and frustration and every mood that the characters feel.

--the world-building is massive, meticulous, and consistent throughout the series. i don't mean to say that every nation, culture, quirk, is broken downand explained in detail--but rather, they're fleshed out throughout the series. you become familiar with the distinctive dress, speech, naming conventions, habits, and temperaments of well over a doezn different cultures through the book, without him ever breaking down and having to explain it. at the time that brandon sanderson took over the writing, there were about 3 million words of wheel of time in print. robert jordan's comprehensive notes included more than 4 million words of unpublished description of the world, of character traits, of nations and histories, everything. and that meticulous care is shown in every book.

--the foresight, having read most of the series twice, is incredible. events in the first book foreshadow events as late as the 13th book, written years after the author had passed away. and by foresight i mean not just in hinting at what's going to happen several books before it does, but also in anticipating what a modern reader would think up and then implementing that. i remember thinking about events and possibilities as they opened up, and imagining (like a silly fantasy nerd kid) how i would do this or use it in that way--and then, two or three books later, feeling both excited that he thought of the same thing i did, and crestfallen because there didn't seem to be an obvious way to improve upon it.

--the "magic" system is beautifully complex, and robert jordan never actually calls it magic, which is pretty cool. it's presented as a natural force, which some can "channel," and with rules as straightforward but as complex as normal physics. the fabric of the universe itself, called the pattern, and the way that our lives (threads of the pattern) weave through it like some giant cosmic quilt, creates a really nifty--but also deep--concept. which is, like other things in the series, revealed gradually and maintained consistently throughout the series.

--the humor. sometimes dry, sometimes overt, but usually there's just a sprinking of subtle comedy mixed in that make it readable. he's superb at summing a character up in one or two sentences, from another character's perspective, that makes you just stop and chuckle a bit.

--the ending, which is worth the whole slog. after book 12, brandon brings his inconsistencies back in line, and the last two books are almost like one gigantic extended climax. it's fulfilling, and it's satisfying, and it's worth it. and it's comforting to know that robert jordan wrote out the entire last scene, years before we actually got to read it.
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i lost track of it over time, and only recently reread all 14 books, more than a decade after my journey first started. it took about six months, but i was able to find the first 11 books online.

a few cons, and then to the pros.

--the dialogue, compared to natural-flowing conversation or today's young-adult novels, seems stiff and not how normal conversations would actually go. this is especially noticeable in the first book, but i quickly became desensitized due to the sheer awesomeness of the story.

--several of the women characters (nynaeve, primarily) are a little-over the top in their drama, and some of the female storylines really bog down the series about halfway through. women play a huge part in this series, but the inter-female drama is clearly told from the viewpoint of a man who somehow sees women as more complex than they actually are.

--jordan likes describing things. a lot. between this and the thick female drama, there are several sections of the series where you're tempted to skim more than to read.

--at the 12th book, brandon sanderson took over writing after robert jordan passed away. a gathering storm was the most difficult to read for me, because sanderson nearly ruined two of my favorite characters up to that point in the story.


so...these seem like pretty big pitfalls, right? why is it still the best epic fantasy ever?

--the characters. the story progresses, in classic epic style, from humble beginnings to the grand scale. but the characters are so fullly fleshed out--with flaws, strengths, quirks, and so on. they plot, they pursue their own goals, and they're often convinced of something the reader knows is false. you become intimate with them, like old friends. you feel the sense of wonder at the new world as characters discover things, you can feel the desperation in hopeless situations, you take part in the mirth and frustration and every mood that the characters feel.

--the world-building is massive, meticulous, and consistent throughout the series. i don't mean to say that every nation, culture, quirk, is broken downand explained in detail--but rather, they're fleshed out throughout the series. you become familiar with the distinctive dress, speech, naming conventions, habits, and temperaments of well over a doezn different cultures through the book, without him ever breaking down and having to explain it. at the time that brandon sanderson took over the writing, there were about 3 million words of wheel of time in print. robert jordan's comprehensive notes included more than 4 million words of unpublished description of the world, of character traits, of nations and histories, everything. and that meticulous care is shown in every book.

--the foresight, having read most of the series twice, is incredible. events in the first book foreshadow events as late as the 13th book, written years after the author had passed away. and by foresight i mean not just in hinting at what's going to happen several books before it does, but also in anticipating what a modern reader would think up and then implementing that. i remember thinking about events and possibilities as they opened up, and imagining (like a silly fantasy nerd kid) how i would do this or use it in that way--and then, two or three books later, feeling both excited that he thought of the same thing i did, and crestfallen because there didn't seem to be an obvious way to improve upon it.

--the "magic" system is beautifully complex, and robert jordan never actually calls it magic, which is pretty cool. it's presented as a natural force, which some can "channel," and with rules as straightforward but as complex as normal physics. the fabric of the universe itself, called the pattern, and the way that our lives (threads of the pattern) weave through it like some giant cosmic quilt, creates a really nifty--but also deep--concept. which is, like other things in the series, revealed gradually and maintained consistently throughout the series.

--the humor. sometimes dry, sometimes overt, but usually there's just a sprinking of subtle comedy mixed in that make it readable. he's superb at summing a character up in one or two sentences, from another character's perspective, that makes you just stop and chuckle a bit.

--the ending, which is worth the whole slog. after book 12, brandon brings his inconsistencies back in line, and the last two books are almost like one gigantic extended climax. it's fulfilling, and it's satisfying, and it's worth it. and it's comforting to know that robert jordan wrote out the entire last scene, years before we actually got to read it.
la ronde and has been re-painted from red to black on the top of the ride. One cannot measure or estimate the length and breadth for me, this is the definitive work of fantasy literature. everything i look at reading comes up for comparison with this series--as well it should, as i started reading when there were only 7 books out. i remember eagerly snatching up the path of daggers as a teenager when it came out, i remember hunting winter's heart down in a local library, and i was devastated when robert jordan passed away in 2007.

i lost track of it over time, and only recently reread all 14 books, more than a decade after my journey first started. it took about six months, but i was able to find the first 11 books online.

a few cons, and then to the pros.

--the dialogue, compared to natural-flowing conversation or today's young-adult novels, seems stiff and not how normal conversations would actually go. this is especially noticeable in the first book, but i quickly became desensitized due to the sheer awesomeness of the story.

--several of the women characters (nynaeve, primarily) are a little-over the top in their drama, and some of the female storylines really bog down the series about halfway through. women play a huge part in this series, but the inter-female drama is clearly told from the viewpoint of a man who somehow sees women as more complex than they actually are.

--jordan likes describing things. a lot. between this and the thick female drama, there are several sections of the series where you're tempted to skim more than to read.

--at the 12th book, brandon sanderson took over writing after robert jordan passed away. a gathering storm was the most difficult to read for me, because sanderson nearly ruined two of my favorite characters up to that point in the story.


so...these seem like pretty big pitfalls, right? why is it still the best epic fantasy ever?

--the characters. the story progresses, in classic epic style, from humble beginnings to the grand scale. but the characters are so fullly fleshed out--with flaws, strengths, quirks, and so on. they plot, they pursue their own goals, and they're often convinced of something the reader knows is false. you become intimate with them, like old friends. you feel the sense of wonder at the new world as characters discover things, you can feel the desperation in hopeless situations, you take part in the mirth and frustration and every mood that the characters feel.

--the world-building is massive, meticulous, and consistent throughout the series. i don't mean to say that every nation, culture, quirk, is broken downand explained in detail--but rather, they're fleshed out throughout the series. you become familiar with the distinctive dress, speech, naming conventions, habits, and temperaments of well over a doezn different cultures through the book, without him ever breaking down and having to explain it. at the time that brandon sanderson took over the writing, there were about 3 million words of wheel of time in print. robert jordan's comprehensive notes included more than 4 million words of unpublished description of the world, of character traits, of nations and histories, everything. and that meticulous care is shown in every book.

--the foresight, having read most of the series twice, is incredible. events in the first book foreshadow events as late as the 13th book, written years after the author had passed away. and by foresight i mean not just in hinting at what's going to happen several books before it does, but also in anticipating what a modern reader would think up and then implementing that. i remember thinking about events and possibilities as they opened up, and imagining (like a silly fantasy nerd kid) how i would do this or use it in that way--and then, two or three books later, feeling both excited that he thought of the same thing i did, and crestfallen because there didn't seem to be an obvious way to improve upon it.

--the "magic" system is beautifully complex, and robert jordan never actually calls it magic, which is pretty cool. it's presented as a natural force, which some can "channel," and with rules as straightforward but as complex as normal physics. the fabric of the universe itself, called the pattern, and the way that our lives (threads of the pattern) weave through it like some giant cosmic quilt, creates a really nifty--but also deep--concept. which is, like other things in the series, revealed gradually and maintained consistently throughout the series.

--the humor. sometimes dry, sometimes overt, but usually there's just a sprinking of subtle comedy mixed in that make it readable. he's superb at summing a character up in one or two sentences, from another character's perspective, that makes you just stop and chuckle a bit.

--the ending, which is worth the whole slog. after book 12, brandon brings his inconsistencies back in line, and the last two books are almost like one gigantic extended climax. it's fulfilling, and it's satisfying, and it's worth it. and it's comforting to know that robert jordan wrote out the entire last scene, years before we actually got to read it.
of his mind. Cons: large breeds may need to size up due to for me, this is the definitive work of fantasy literature. everything i look at reading comes up for comparison with this series--as well it should, as i started reading when there were only 7 books out. i remember eagerly snatching up the path of daggers as a teenager when it came out, i remember hunting winter's heart down in a local library, and i was devastated when robert jordan passed away in 2007.

i lost track of it over time, and only recently reread all 14 books, more than a decade after my journey first started. it took about six months, but i was able to find the first 11 books online.

a few cons, and then to the pros.

--the dialogue, compared to natural-flowing conversation or today's young-adult novels, seems stiff and not how normal conversations would actually go. this is especially noticeable in the first book, but i quickly became desensitized due to the sheer awesomeness of the story.

--several of the women characters (nynaeve, primarily) are a little-over the top in their drama, and some of the female storylines really bog down the series about halfway through. women play a huge part in this series, but the inter-female drama is clearly told from the viewpoint of a man who somehow sees women as more complex than they actually are.

--jordan likes describing things. a lot. between this and the thick female drama, there are several sections of the series where you're tempted to skim more than to read.

--at the 12th book, brandon sanderson took over writing after robert jordan passed away. a gathering storm was the most difficult to read for me, because sanderson nearly ruined two of my favorite characters up to that point in the story.


so...these seem like pretty big pitfalls, right? why is it still the best epic fantasy ever?

--the characters. the story progresses, in classic epic style, from humble beginnings to the grand scale. but the characters are so fullly fleshed out--with flaws, strengths, quirks, and so on. they plot, they pursue their own goals, and they're often convinced of something the reader knows is false. you become intimate with them, like old friends. you feel the sense of wonder at the new world as characters discover things, you can feel the desperation in hopeless situations, you take part in the mirth and frustration and every mood that the characters feel.

--the world-building is massive, meticulous, and consistent throughout the series. i don't mean to say that every nation, culture, quirk, is broken downand explained in detail--but rather, they're fleshed out throughout the series. you become familiar with the distinctive dress, speech, naming conventions, habits, and temperaments of well over a doezn different cultures through the book, without him ever breaking down and having to explain it. at the time that brandon sanderson took over the writing, there were about 3 million words of wheel of time in print. robert jordan's comprehensive notes included more than 4 million words of unpublished description of the world, of character traits, of nations and histories, everything. and that meticulous care is shown in every book.

--the foresight, having read most of the series twice, is incredible. events in the first book foreshadow events as late as the 13th book, written years after the author had passed away. and by foresight i mean not just in hinting at what's going to happen several books before it does, but also in anticipating what a modern reader would think up and then implementing that. i remember thinking about events and possibilities as they opened up, and imagining (like a silly fantasy nerd kid) how i would do this or use it in that way--and then, two or three books later, feeling both excited that he thought of the same thing i did, and crestfallen because there didn't seem to be an obvious way to improve upon it.

--the "magic" system is beautifully complex, and robert jordan never actually calls it magic, which is pretty cool. it's presented as a natural force, which some can "channel," and with rules as straightforward but as complex as normal physics. the fabric of the universe itself, called the pattern, and the way that our lives (threads of the pattern) weave through it like some giant cosmic quilt, creates a really nifty--but also deep--concept. which is, like other things in the series, revealed gradually and maintained consistently throughout the series.

--the humor. sometimes dry, sometimes overt, but usually there's just a sprinking of subtle comedy mixed in that make it readable. he's superb at summing a character up in one or two sentences, from another character's perspective, that makes you just stop and chuckle a bit.

--the ending, which is worth the whole slog. after book 12, brandon brings his inconsistencies back in line, and the last two books are almost like one gigantic extended climax. it's fulfilling, and it's satisfying, and it's worth it. and it's comforting to know that robert jordan wrote out the entire last scene, years before we actually got to read it.
non-stretchy material, may not fully cover the belly for larger dogs. De pil moest worden verguld en aan de teruggedrongen concurrenten moest op for me, this is the definitive work of fantasy literature. everything i look at reading comes up for comparison with this series--as well it should, as i started reading when there were only 7 books out. i remember eagerly snatching up the path of daggers as a teenager when it came out, i remember hunting winter's heart down in a local library, and i was devastated when robert jordan passed away in 2007.

i lost track of it over time, and only recently reread all 14 books, more than a decade after my journey first started. it took about six months, but i was able to find the first 11 books online.

a few cons, and then to the pros.

--the dialogue, compared to natural-flowing conversation or today's young-adult novels, seems stiff and not how normal conversations would actually go. this is especially noticeable in the first book, but i quickly became desensitized due to the sheer awesomeness of the story.

--several of the women characters (nynaeve, primarily) are a little-over the top in their drama, and some of the female storylines really bog down the series about halfway through. women play a huge part in this series, but the inter-female drama is clearly told from the viewpoint of a man who somehow sees women as more complex than they actually are.

--jordan likes describing things. a lot. between this and the thick female drama, there are several sections of the series where you're tempted to skim more than to read.

--at the 12th book, brandon sanderson took over writing after robert jordan passed away. a gathering storm was the most difficult to read for me, because sanderson nearly ruined two of my favorite characters up to that point in the story.


so...these seem like pretty big pitfalls, right? why is it still the best epic fantasy ever?

--the characters. the story progresses, in classic epic style, from humble beginnings to the grand scale. but the characters are so fullly fleshed out--with flaws, strengths, quirks, and so on. they plot, they pursue their own goals, and they're often convinced of something the reader knows is false. you become intimate with them, like old friends. you feel the sense of wonder at the new world as characters discover things, you can feel the desperation in hopeless situations, you take part in the mirth and frustration and every mood that the characters feel.

--the world-building is massive, meticulous, and consistent throughout the series. i don't mean to say that every nation, culture, quirk, is broken downand explained in detail--but rather, they're fleshed out throughout the series. you become familiar with the distinctive dress, speech, naming conventions, habits, and temperaments of well over a doezn different cultures through the book, without him ever breaking down and having to explain it. at the time that brandon sanderson took over the writing, there were about 3 million words of wheel of time in print. robert jordan's comprehensive notes included more than 4 million words of unpublished description of the world, of character traits, of nations and histories, everything. and that meticulous care is shown in every book.

--the foresight, having read most of the series twice, is incredible. events in the first book foreshadow events as late as the 13th book, written years after the author had passed away. and by foresight i mean not just in hinting at what's going to happen several books before it does, but also in anticipating what a modern reader would think up and then implementing that. i remember thinking about events and possibilities as they opened up, and imagining (like a silly fantasy nerd kid) how i would do this or use it in that way--and then, two or three books later, feeling both excited that he thought of the same thing i did, and crestfallen because there didn't seem to be an obvious way to improve upon it.

--the "magic" system is beautifully complex, and robert jordan never actually calls it magic, which is pretty cool. it's presented as a natural force, which some can "channel," and with rules as straightforward but as complex as normal physics. the fabric of the universe itself, called the pattern, and the way that our lives (threads of the pattern) weave through it like some giant cosmic quilt, creates a really nifty--but also deep--concept. which is, like other things in the series, revealed gradually and maintained consistently throughout the series.

--the humor. sometimes dry, sometimes overt, but usually there's just a sprinking of subtle comedy mixed in that make it readable. he's superb at summing a character up in one or two sentences, from another character's perspective, that makes you just stop and chuckle a bit.

--the ending, which is worth the whole slog. after book 12, brandon brings his inconsistencies back in line, and the last two books are almost like one gigantic extended climax. it's fulfilling, and it's satisfying, and it's worth it. and it's comforting to know that robert jordan wrote out the entire last scene, years before we actually got to read it.
het tweede of derde plan ook iets worden gegund. When homer accidentally spills beer all over the keyboard while the family are on the internet, they are sucked into the computer and are sent to the game engine. 11095